Strong Island Co.

Harbours & The Solent

Photography Kayak Trip In May With Portsmouth Watersports

Portsmouth Watersports are running another of their popular kayaking trips on Langstone Harbour, focusing specifically on photography. You can kayak around the beautiful Harbour and with a bit of luck you can spot & photograph seals and different birds (such as terns) plus a variety of important archaeological features, including the Mulberry Harbour, which was built in support of the D-Day landings. Langstone Harbour contains four islands and large expanses of mud flats, shingle banks and sand banks which are exposed at low water, this is a great opportunity to explore the harbour with your camera in a really fun, new way.

The kayak photography trip will be on Sunday 15th May from 9:30am to 1pm, and only £40 per person. All kayaking equipment and kit is supplied, you will be given basic instruction on kayaking, and led on the trip by an experienced instructor. All you need to do is to bring your camera and cross your fingers for seals sunbathing!

Limited spaces are available, to book please call 02392 663873. For more details visit:

www.portsmouthwatersports.com




Photos from Historic Milton Locks Photo Walkshop

Saturday morning was our first photography walkshop out at the historic Milton Locks, where the old Portsmouth Canal joined Langstone Harbour. We started off on the low tide shoreline looking for old items and textures in the sand, shingle and mud before looking at triptychs of the old wreaked boat up on the beach.

From here we made our way out on to the mud and in to the old lock gates before looking in, around and through the small boats pulled up on the shore. The tide was getting very low so we made our way out in to the harbour on the slipway trying out short depth of field and rule of thirds. The sun popped out near the end as we photographed the geese on the mud and overhead and the old ‘rope boat’ that is a bit of a local landmark.

Below are some photos from Saturday morning’s walkshop, you can see lots more on our Facebook page.

Our next walkshop is at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard on the 19th March, which still has a few limited spaces left which can be booked online HERE. You can find out more about our Photography Walkshops at:

www.photowalkshops.com

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

Strong Island Photo Walkshop - Milton Lock

The Lifeboat Station Project Visits Portsmouth – The Final Photos

The Lifeboat Station Project is a photography project by Jack Lowe for the RNLI that aims to to document all 237 RNLI Lifeboat Stations in the UK and Republic of Ireland using Victorian photographic methods. The project recently visited RNLI Portsmouth back in January where the station and crews were photographed with a large format glass plate camera capturing beautiful Ambrotype (a variant of the wet plate collodion process) images. With each visit a photo is taken of the view from the station, the Coxswain and one of the crew.

You can find out more about the project and see all the completed stations galleries at The Lifeboat Station Project where you can also buy limited edition prints, with the Portsmouth photos now available HERE. The outcome of this incredible project looks to be a book and a large exhibition.

lifeboatstationproject.com

This image below of Jack Lowe at work was shot by me on a work trip, happening upon the project visit at Fowey in Cornwall.

The Lifeboat Station Project - Jack Lowe

Each station has the same set of photos, with images of the helmsmen/helmswomen or Coxswain, the crew(s) and a view from the station out to the water and the images below are from the project trip to Portsmouth.

The photos are used with the kind permission of the photographer Jack Lowe.

Six Portsmouth Lifeboat Station Helmsmen by Jack Lowe
Six Portsmouth Lifeboat Station Helmsmen by Jack Lowe.

Portsmouth Lifeboat Station volunteers with their Atlantic 85, RNLB Norma T. by Jack Lowe
Portsmouth Lifeboat Station volunteers with their Atlantic 85, RNLB Norma T. by Jack Lowe.

Three Women of Portsmouth RNLI by Jack Lowe
Three Women of Portsmouth RNLI by Jack Lowe.

Portsmouth RNLI Boathouse View by Jack Lowe
Portsmouth RNLI Boathouse View (overlooking the Langstone Harbour entrance) by Jack Lowe.

The Lifeboat Station Project Visits Portsmouth

The Lifeboat Station Project is a photography project by Jack Lowe for the RNLI that aims to to document all 237 RNLI Lifeboat Stations in the UK and Republic of Ireland using Victorian photographic methods. The project visits RNLI Portsmouth today (a thankfully sunny day for a change) where the crew will be photographed with a large format glass plate camera capturing beautiful Ambrotype (a variant of the wet plate collodion process) images. With each visit a photo is taken of the view from the station, the Coxswain and one of the crew.

You can find out more about the project and see all the completed stations galleries at The Lifeboat Station Project where you can also buy limited edition prints (with the Portsmouth one soon to be available). The outcome of this incredible project looks to be a book and a large exhibition.

lifeboatstationproject.com

This image below of Jack Lowe at work was shot by me on a work trip, happening upon the project visit at Fowey in Cornwall.

The Lifeboat Station Project - Jack Lowe

The images below are from the project and copyright of photographer Jack Lowe.


The Lifeboat Station Project: 10×12″ Ambrotype by Jack Lowe
The view from the top of the slipway at Cromer Lifeboat Station, Saturday 17th January 2015.


The Lifeboat Station Project: 10×12″ Ambrotype by Jack Lowe
The Aldeburgh RNLI Lifeboat Crew, Saturday 7th March 2015.

America’s Cup Racing Week In Portsmouth

I think my first memories of the America’s Cup were from childhood, watching the news and being a little confused about stories of close races, steely eyed crews battling the southern ocean and controversial keel designs on these huge yachts on seas and oceans the other side of the World. Up until recently it still felt like it was an event that happened far from here, glimpsed on TV, racing in exotic locations on distant waters. With the news of the new Ben Ainslie Racing headquarters to be located and built in Portsmouth about a year or so ago, all of a sudden, this race, this event really started to capture my attention. Could the UK win the oldest international sporting trophy, with a team based in Portsmouth? Back in the waters where the race began?

Americas Cup

No longer will these elite teams sailing ‘formula one’ yachts built from cutting edge designs, technologies and materials feel so distant, as the 35th Americas Cup event began to arrive in the city over recent days in readiness for the racing long weekend next week. On Twitter it has been hard to miss the photos from local people of the Land Rover BAR AC45F flying on training sails in the Solent. In recent days our local team has been joined by New Zealand and other teams out on the Solent, with the 45 foot long catamarans flying at speeds of 40 mph all just 50 metres offshore. Our historic dockyard home to the yachts from all corners of the Earth and our city home to the first stage of the cup. Now the stages and stands are being built, the flags are up and in a matter of days the racing will begin! Check below for the detail list of all the America’s Cup events happening in the city.

We’re happy to also announce that Strong Island Clothing Co will be at the America’s Cup race village, be sure to drop by and say hello and check out the huge new summer range of tees. More details on this soon.

Americas Cup Flags in Southsea

Thursday 23rd July

The America’s Cup officially begins on Thursday 23rd July, with Southsea Common, Old Portsmouth and the Solent alive with activity all starting from 9am in the morning. You’ll be able to see the crew and craft prepare for the day’s racing in No. 1 Basin at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard in the morning before the race village on Southsea Common opens at 11am. The day’s events are as follows:

  • – 9am to 11am: The race teams and boats get ready in the Naval Base – come and view in the Historic Dockyard
  • – 10am: Race Village opens on Southsea Common and the day
  • – 11am: The America’s Cup ‘trophy’ arrives in style
  • – 11:15am to 12:30pm: Moth racing and kitesurfing displays
  • – 12:30pm: The Official Parade of Sail leaves the Royal Navy base and escorts the race fleet out to the race course area in front of the race village on Southsea Common
  • – 12:45pm to 2:30pm Official Parade of Sail and exhibition sailing by the race teams
  • – 3pm: Skippers come ashore
  • – 3:15pm: Official press conference & presentation of skippers in Fanzone Arena
  • – 5pm: Day programme ends
  • – 6:30pm: Evening programme opens
  • – 7pm to 7:45pm: Official Opening Ceremony
  • – 8pm – 10pm: South Coast Proms concert featuring The Massed Bands of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines

Friday 24th July

Friday sees streaks of colour on both the Solent and the skies above, with the day dedicated to speed. See below planned activities for the day and evening:

  • – 9am to 11am: The race teams and boats get ready in the Naval Base – come and view in the Historic Dockyard
  • – 10am: Race Village opens on Southsea Common and the day
  • – 11am to 12pm: Moth racing and kitesurfing displays
  • – 12:10pm to 12:30pm: Red Arrows Aerial Display
  • – 12:30pm: The race boats leave the Royal Navy base and are escorted to the race course area in front of the race village on Southsea Common
  • – 12:45pm to 1:20pm: Race boats tuning up before practice racing with live MC commentary
  • – 1:30pm to 3pm: Practise starts and two practise races
  • – 3:15pm: Skippers come ashore
  • – 3:30pm: Media mixed zone with skippers in Fanzone Arena
  • – 5pm: Day programme ends
  • – 6:30pm: Evening programme opens
  • – 7:15pm to 9:30pm: South Coast Proms concert featuring The Massed Bands of Her Majesty’s Royal Marines

Saturday 25th July

On Saturday sailing gets serious and points are won or lost with the full official racing of the 35th America’s Cup kicking off. The evening also sees Portsmouth Live! with music on the big stage down on Southsea Common:

  • – 9am to 11am: The race teams and boats get ready in the Naval Base – come and view in the Historic Dockyard
  • – 10am: Race Village opens on Southsea Common and the day
  • – 10:30am: RNLI helicopter display
  • – 11am – 1230: Moth racing and kitesurfing displays
  • – 12pm: Red Bull Matador Aerial Display
  • – 12:30pm: The race boats leave the Royal Navy base and are escorted to the race course area in front of the race village on Southsea Common
  • – 12:45pm to 1:20pm: Race boats tuning up before racing with live MC commentary
  • – 1:30pm to 3pm: Two offical America’s Cup World Series Races
  • – 3:15pm: Skippers come ashore
  • – 3:30pm: Skippers in media mixed zone in Fanzone Arena
  • – 4pm: Blades Aerial Display
  • – 5pm: Day programme end
  • – 6pm: Evening programme open
  • – 7pm – 11pm: Portsmouth Live! Saturday day concert featuring Spandau Ballet, WetWetWet, McBusted and Carly Rae Jepsen

Super Sunday 26th July

Sunday is guaranteed to be ‘super’ – a fantastic finale to the event where the overall winner will be decided through what is sure to be some nail biting racing. As ever a full programme on entertainment on shore and on water and then an amazing prizegiving gala event to end it all. The Duke & Duchess of Cambridge are set to join huge crowds on Sunday to view the racing play a key part in the finale prizegiving event too. See below planned activities for the day and evening: See below planned activities for the day and evening:

  • – 9am to 11am: The race teams and boats get ready in the Naval Base – come and view in the Historic Dockyard
  • – 10am: Race Village opens on Southsea Common
  • – 10:30am: RNLI helicopter display
  • – 11am to 12:30pm: Moth racing and kitesurfing displays
  • – 12pm: Trig Aerial Display
  • – 12:30pm: The race boats leave the Royal Navy base and are escorted to the race course area in front of the race village on Southsea Common
  • – 12:45pm to 1:20pm: Race boats tuning up before racing with live MC commentary
  • – 1:30pm to 3pm: Two offical America’s Cup World Series races
  • – 3:15pm: Skippers come ashore
  • – 3:30pm: Skippers in media mixed zone in Fanzone Arena
  • – 4pm: All skippers and sailors to main stage in Waterfront Festival Arena
  • – 4:15pm to 5pm: Gala prizegiving event in main stage in Waterfront Festival Arena
  • – 6:30pm: Spitfire Aerial Display

These times are subject to change.

Tickets for the America’s Cup are still available HERE.

Waterfront Festival Arena – Free ticket required for day entry.
10am to 5pm Thursday/Friday/Saturday.
10am to 6pm Sunday.

Fanzone Arena – Paid ticket required for day entry.
10am to 6pm Thursday/Friday/Saturday.
10am to 6:30pm Sunday

Fanzone Arena tickets are on sale across all four days Thursday 23rd – Sunday, July 26, which will also give access to the Sunday prizegiving. All current Waterfront Festival Arena (free) ticket holders will also be able to watch the prize giving show.

Portsmouth Live! Music night – Paid ticket required for entry.

Portsmouth Live!

Blades

America's Cup World Series Naples 2013 - Race Day 3

Red Bull


Kayak Photography Trips in Langstone Harbour with Portsmouth Watersports

We recently went on a boat trip out in Langstone Harbour with our cameras looking for birds and wildlife but if you want something at a bit of a more leisurely pace Portsmouth Watersports are running photography kayak trips out in the harbour in July. Portsmouth Watersports are offering the photographers of Portsmouth the chance to kayak out with a guide to the many islands and mudbanks that appear at low tide around the harbour to visit the bird sanctuaries and to see the seals that also call the local harbours home. You do not have to be a competent kayaker to take part on these tours and you will be supplied all the kit you require.

There are two kayak trips planned:

Sunday 12th July, from 2.30pm to 5.30pm
Saturday 22nd August, from 10am to 1pm

The trips cost only £35 per person and spaces are very limited, if you would like to book on, please contact Joanne on 02392 663873.

Below are a few photos from a seal boat trip in neighbouring Chichester Harbour. These seals travel up and down the Solent and the mud banks down by the Watersports centre is a particularly popular sunbathing spot for them.

Don’t forget this summer we are running our wildlife photography competition with the RSPB, so if you are out on a kayak and get great shots of the three different birds we a re after, send them in for a chance to win some Strong Island and RSPB prizes.




Our Langstone Harbour Trip with the RSPB

On a grey yet thankfully dry Sunday morning if I had a Portsmouth bucket list, I had one of the items near the top ticked off with a boat trip with the RSPB. Personally, I’ve always loved Langstone Harbour. When I first moved to Portsmouth I lived at the Furze Lane Langstone campus of the University of Portsmouth and the harbour was on my door step and one of the first places I explored with my bike and camera. Throughout the years I’ve been lucky enough to explore every yard of its edge plus the sandbank and the Phoenix Breakwater with my camera, from high tide to low, but I haven’t had a chance to explore the islands.

The thing, for me, that makes Langstone Harbour extra special is that it is a wild habitat right on the doorstep of the most densely populated city in the UK. Considering the close proximity to well over two hundred thousand people, the harbour is surprisingly biodiverse and a key nesting location for birds on the south coast. More surprising is that for birds, Langstone Harbour has way, way more calling it home through the seasons than its neighbour Chichester Harbour. So…all of this wildlife shares Portsmouth with us, and us with them. Particularly at this time of year: nesting season. So for the very, very novice twitcher side of me, a boat trip out to see the birds with the RSPB was a fantastic opportunity.




We set off from the slipway at Broadmarsh Costal Park south of Havant with Wez at the boat controls and Dawn to help both myself and Tristan find out more about the wildlife and what the RSPB do in regards to the harbour and the bird populations. It was a good start with lots of Mute Swans seeing us off from the quayside and even a low flying Heron passing overhead. We travelled south, in parallel with the shore of Long Island, one of many different islands in the harbour that have (since the late 1970s) become protected bird preserves of the RSPB. We passed the southern tip of the island, which is one of the few areas where the public can land (we saw kayakers taking a break on the small shingle beach) before moving south west to Round Nap Island.


Long Island.


I’ve always been intrigued by the harbour’s islands and as they are off limits to the public this was my first chance to see them up close. Round Nap Island is quite small and at high tide seemed like a very flat and precarious home to the nesting birds and visiting birds too. On the shingle we saw Black Headed Gulls with their brown, fuzzy and big chicks who will be very soon flying themselves. Also on the island we saw quiet Cormorants taking a rest from fishing and curious Oyster Catchers exploring the shingle and waterline for food.


Round Nap Island.


Cormorants on Round Nap Island.

The RSPB routinely (at times, daily) check the nesting islands to ensure the birds aren’t effected by the many different dangers to them, their nests and their young. At low tide some of these islands are accessible by the mudflats so some islands have electric fences to protect against foxes and other predators. Another serious danger to these birds are storms and surging tides. Recently a storm washed away nests and seriously effecting the breeding of some of the harbours most important visitors.




Black Headed Gull.

From Round Nap Island we set off to the much larger South Binness Island, the most southerly of the islands in the harbour. As we travelled along the southern shore of the island we saw hundreds and hundreds of Black headed Gulls and their young plus the sharp edged Sandwich Terns, Common Terns and our first sighting of the beautiful Little Terns that visit the harbour each year. The Little Terns have struggled in recent years to raise young due to weather and tides and in 2013 this island was raised up with 500 tonnes of aggregate with the hope that their ‘scrapes’ would be better protected.


South Binness Island.


Oyster Catcher and Black Header Gulls on South Binness Island.


South Binness Island.


Black Headed Gull chicks on South Binness Island.


South Binness Island.


Sandwich Tern.

Little Terns are very special visitors to Portsmouth. Unknown to me until fairly recently, Portsmouth and Langstone Harbour is home to one of the largest colonies of these special birds, along with Blakeney Point and Great Yarmouth in Norfolk and Minsmere in Suffolk. You might find the birds in much smaller groups around the coast of the UK, including Scotland…but right here in Portsmouth is a key nesting site in the UK. Sadly these birds have difficulty in producing young as our weather has been bad in consecutive years but they will continue to try through the rest of the season. There are only 1,900 (approx.) breeding pairs in the UK so the work done locally by the RSPB to support and help these birds is vital. To put it in context, on South Binness Island alone in 2008 the island had 4,886 nesting pairs of Black Headed Gulls.


Little Tern.


Little Tern.


Wez.

We travelled west past the island and out to a place I have wanted to visit for years, Oyster Island. Many years ago this small island was home to an oyster watchman’s house built in 1819. I had heard that you could still see the foundations and remains of the house (which was possibly washed away in a storm) still on this tiny island south of Farlington Marshes. As we approached you could clearly see on this tiny island the timber beams of the house plus bricks and more. Hard to believe that someone could live out here, right on the harbour.


Oyster Island.


Oyster Island.

From here we travelled to Baker’s Island with it’s northerly wild side. The RSPB obviously tries to not disturb the birds but there are occasions when it is necessary to land on one of the islands. Routinely the RSPB need to count the nests and check for any issues. Sometimes they have to fix fencing and maintain signs, etc, on this occasion Wez had to replace the electric fence battery so we grounded the boat on the beach for a few minutes. Obviously it is vital these islands are not visited by the public so this was an unexpected privilege to see this habitat up close for a minute or two.


Baker’s Island.


Oyster Catcher on Baker’s Island.


Surrounding the boat at Baker’s Island.

We set off from here and travelled east across the harbour and midway saw a large commercial vessel leave the quay at the Lafarge Tarmac site and travel towards the harbour entrance. It was a good reminder that despite being a quiet harbour there is still commercial activity on a day to day basis. There are also fishing vessels that work within the harbour too.


Commercial vessel passing Round Nap Island.




Tris.

The old oyster beds on Hayling Island’s north westerly edge (next to the ‘Billy’) have a long history, from farming huger amounts of oysters for consumption in London (ending due to pollution) to them being neglected until recent years when they were restored and made a protected RSPB area. These interlinking beds are now home to many different birds and access is prevented from Hayling Island as well as from boats. From here we saw a harbour favourite the Little Egret and also a solo Great Crested Grebe before it dived under the water and disappeared. On the way back to Broadmarsh we were lucky to see about a dozen Common Terns feeding, with them circling, hovering and then diving in to the harbour waters. We also saw some Little Terns too, who only feed around one kilometre from their nesting sites.


Little Egret at Hayling Island Oyster Beds.




Diving Common Tern.


In only a matter of two hours we had an incredible trip around the harbour and were introduced to not just the birds that call Portsmouth home but also the dedicated work by the RSPB, who with a very small team have to protect the habitats and birds. If you want to keep up to date with the work done by your local RSPB team be sure to follow their blog HERE. A huge thank you to Wez and Dawn for the trip!

Interested in seeing some of these birds yourself? It is actually pretty easy from the shoreline of the city of Portsmouth. We’re working with the RSPB on a series of articles starting tomorrow and we’ll be running a competition too. More details tomorrow.

Design The America’s Cup World Series Poster

This July 23rd-26th Sir Ben Ainslie and the America’s Cup World Series is coming to Portsmouth. Aspex and Teamorigin, the organisers of the World Series event, are offering local artists the chance to design the official poster of the America’s Cup World Series Portsmouth event.

Artists are asked to submit an existing portfolio of work, limited to 10 pieces, in a single PDF document with a maximum file size of 20MB — along with an outline idea for their poster design.

From these submissions, they will commission one winning artist to create the official poster for the Portsmouth event. The commissioned artist will be paid a fee of £1,000 for this work. However please note that copyright of the poster will then be passed to Teamorigin Events.

The deadline for submissions is Sunday 29th March. You can email your submissions to acws@aspex.org.uk.

Timeline and Key Stages

Sunday 29 March 2015 – Deadline for submissions

w/c 30 March – Artist selection

Early April – Selected artist notified and commission agreed

Early-mid May – Artwork delivered by artist

End May – Poster finalised/printed

23rd-26th July – ACWS event

Ben Ainslie Americas Cup Poster

South Parade Trust X Portsmouth School Of Architecture

As mentioned back in December, the volunteers of the South Parade Trust are teaming up with the academic might of Portsmouth School of Architecture in order to bring you all an exciting new project:

“The South Parade Trust would like to invite all interested locals and supporters to attend a public consultation event where YOU will be able to give your thoughts on how South Parade Pier could be re-developed. In partnership with the University of Portsmouth School of Architecture and overseen and planned by Catherine Teeling, a senior lecturer at the school, Masters students from the School of Architecture have begun a project that will explore creative ideas and strategies for the regeneration of South Parade Pier.

The project will develop solutions for reuse of the pier that respond to the community’s desires and interests and supports the SPT vision that the pier can once again become both a hub for the local community, a functioning business and an asset for the City.

Students bring a range of expertise to the project from Sustainable Architecture, Historic Building Conservation, Urban Design and Interior Design, however for the ideas to truly represent the future vision as the ‘Peoples Pier’ this live event has been organised for the community to ‘Have Your Say’ on its potential future, to get your thoughts and ideas on what this could be.

Catherine Teeling, Senior Lecturer at the Portsmouth School of Architecture, had this to say:
This is an exciting project, we try to use local structures for the students and what better than an iconic structure such as the pier. We are also very proud to partner with the Trust on this event, it will be of huge value for the students to speak to the local public and hear their thoughts on how South Parade Pier can be re-imagined for the 21st century

Vanessa Cooter, travel and tourism lecturer at Highbury College, added: “This is a great example of how the Trust can engage directly with local organisations such as the University and use their skills to collate and quantify local opinion on their pier. We all have an interest in how it is rebuilt in the future, this project will deliver bold and exciting plans which may one day be implemented or at least demonstrate what would be possible with imagination, innovation and drive.

We hope that as many of you as are able to will visit us during the day at the Royal Beach Hotel opposite the pier and contribute to the Students projects which will, we very much hope, deliver exciting visions for the future use of South Parade Pier. More details will be announced in the coming weeks in the lead up to the event. We hope you will be able to come along! We want to hear from YOU!”

This public engagement event will be held on the 21st of February 2015 at the Royal Beach Hotel, from 9am to 4pm.

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South Parade Trust Enamel Pin Badges

The fine folks over at the South Parade Pier Trust have released their new range of enamel pin badges, available here. Show your love to the pier and your support to this non-profit organisation by having one in your stocking. Also be sure to keep an eye out for their exciting new project, in partnership with the University of Portsmouth School of Architecture, landing in early 2015. You can keep up to date with all the going ons of the Trust by giving them a like here and follow here.

The enamel pin badges are also for sale at Southsea Rock on Marmion in Southsea, and at the reception of Highbury College Library on Winston Churchill Avenue. Hurry, whilst stocks last!

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Archives

Guildhall After WWII

On 10th January 1941 during a heavy bombing attack on Portsmouth the Guildhall was hit by several incendiary bombs which heavily damaged the structure and the resulting fires quickly spread throughout the whole building, turning it in to just a shell. It took almost 15 years to rebuild the Guildhall in to what we have today, which was officially reopened by the Queen on the 8th June 1959. This photo from Stan Webb from a collection of photos collected by Portsmouth College shows how totally destroyed the building was, leaving just some of the frontage and most of the tower.

Guildhall

Aerial Photographs of Portsmouth

Webb Aviation have hundreds of aerial photographs to purchase from all over the country. Click the link to see the Portsmouth Aerial Gallery and view photos from over Gosport looking across Gunwharf, all the way down to the Hayling Ferry.

aerial photograph by www.webbaviation.co.uk

aerial photograph by www.webbaviation.co.uk

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Local Photographer – Harvey Mills

Okay, so it’s not quite on the Island, but hey, when the content is this good we can forget about the extra few miles. Harvey Mills shoots Murray Cross chomping the Langstone 13 set on the Havant roundabout with ease. Perfect timing and composition from Harvey.

Check out Harvey’s webiste www.harveymills.com and also his Flickr. Below are photos of Charles and Southsesa’s buttery own Bored teamrider Adam Keys.

Portsmouth – Not The New Malta

Do you remember our post about Portsmouth, The New Malta and the advertising campaign that has been going on? The Telegraph has written a short article in response to the campaign. Check it out HERE and follow it up in the comments. Unfashionable, now come on Telegraph.

“We probably get about two weeks of sunshine at best, and you are more used to seeing people fighting than socialising in a quaint café,” said Tim Courtnell, a life-long Portsmouth resident. “The beach at Southsea is a mixture of shingle and Stella Artois cans on most days, and you wouldn’t think of swimming in the sea.”

new-malta

£800 raised at our 3rd Birthday Charity Raffle

Wow. Another Incredible success. Myself, Paul and the Strong Island Crew owe a MASSIVE thank you to all the people who donated, helped out, attended and of course bought those ever so important raffle tickets.

With your generosity we managed to raise an amazing £800 for The Portsmouth Autism Support Network and The Portsmouth Lifeboat Station.

Everyone had a great time and got fully involved in the atmosphere of the night. Free Strong Island Iced Teas were flowing, and the buffet was awesome. Pet Sounds kept the musical vibe alive and the crowd did the rest. A really good turn out of Strong Islanders made sure The Belle Isle was packed and the charity tin was full.

Well done to all the people who were lucky enough to get one of the prizes. If not more. Winners win prizes…..

Thanks to everyone who came down, all of the very generous prize donators and of course extra special thanks to Paul, Graham, Ben, James, Andy and all The Belle Isle staff for letting us hold our party and making sure no one went thirsty. Cheers guys.

Without the support from our readers, contributors and friends Strong Island would not be in the position to hold such an event, and we greatly appreciate it.

Prizes were very kindly donated from the following people: LJRs / The Belle Isle / Sopranos / Southsea Skatepark / Caravan Gallery / Michelle So Scone / Boed / Southsea Boutique / Dead Mans Glory / Lou Bush / Helen at Kings Theatre / Geoff at The Wedge / Love Southsea / Mikey Ayling / Mark Persuad / Southsea Gallery / james Porter / Parmiters, Ian & Sue / James Weaver / Alanna Smith / Matt Howarth / Bruce Jamieson / Jamie Olivers (Megatron) / Diana Goss / James Batchelor / Fran Bierton / Paul Thurlow / Bonzo Studio / Head Hairdressers / I Love Dust / Holgarama / Stuart Trett at Ye Olde Bike SHoppe. Apologies if I forgot your name.

We’re already looking forward to our 4th Birthday Party next year. Hope you can make it. All the best and thanks again.

Tristan & Paul




















Photos: Matt Saxey

Irving & Co. Local Brewery

Seeing as Portsmouth has such a rich history for pubs and naval culture I thought i’d bring your attention to something that combines the both.  Irving & Co brewers are situated at Railway Triangle in Farlington and have their doors open for tourists as well as turning out a fine range of real ales to a huge number of pubs in and around the Portsmouth area.

Irving and Co brings the welcome return of brewing to Portsmouth and a brewery to excite the taste buds of drinkers in Hampshire, Sussex and beyond. The company aim is to produce the highest quality traditional cask beers supplying the local market within 45 miles of Portsmouth.

Malcolm Irving ably assisted by Mark Doswell bring together 29 years of combined brewing industry experience to produce beers that they thoroughly enjoy and about which they care passionately. It’s not just a job, it’s definitely not just beer, it is a way of life.

Vintage Photos

Adam Wintle recently uploaded to his blog loads of photos from an old book about Portsmouth passed down to him by his dad. Some of the photos in the book are incredible, be sure to spend some time having a good look through, below are a few examples:

Southsea Show 1970

Image: eBay

Portsmouth on Film – Episode 3

The next episode of Jonathan & Matthew Ring’s vintage family footage ‘Portsmouth on Film’ went up recently. This episode is of a round Portsmouth car journey back in 1998.

Snow, Snow, Snow

Snow hit Southsea pretty hard last night and it snowing again this morning. Good luck to everyone battling the elements to get to work, college, school, etc today. Here are a few photos from last night, if you have any please pop a link to them in the comments, we would love to see them.

Adam Wintle (see more here):

Adam Wintle

Adam Wintle

Elizabeth Bick (see more here):

Elizabeth Bick

Elizabeth Bick

Strong Island Clothing Co.

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